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Thread: Clash between Chasers and Spotters

  1. #41
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    Brian, If you're in N.C. or Central Kansas, we'll be glad to take your reports via K-Link when we have ICT NWS talking to us taking reports. I've never heard them turn anybody away.
    I'd advise having a dual band (2m/70cm) in our area, as most of the repeaters are 70cm.

    Justin N0UJQ
    Minneapolis, KS

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Reed View Post
    Brian, If you're in N.C. or Central Kansas, we'll be glad to take your reports via K-Link when we have ICT NWS talking to us taking reports. I've never heard them turn anybody away.
    I'd advise having a dual band (2m/70cm) in our area, as most of the repeaters are 70cm.

    Justin N0UJQ
    Minneapolis, KS
    Do I need a general license for 70cm?

  3. #43

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    The best nets out there are those that find ways to bring all types of weather observers together and get their info. Whether they be fixed spotters, mobile spotters, chasers, even yahoos, whatever. It's obvious they are more interested in serving the true mission of NWS & Skywarn instead of serving their net. They see their net as a tool to bring people together and get the info rather than seeing the net as the primary mission. Unfortunately, these nets are few and far between. And because of this, I haven't participated in ham spotter nets for a long time. I chase as a hobby, because it's something I enjoy. I'm not going to sully my experience by arguing with some misdirected net.

    Thank you SN. You give me the freedom to enjoy my hobby while contributing to public safety.

  4. #44
    Member Tim Shriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Davidson View Post
    Do I need a general license for 70cm?
    Nope, a tech license works fine. We use 70cm (UHF) for our spotters here. Works well and less lightning crash static.
    Also penetrates walls better.

    Tim
    MW122-WX9TRS
    MidWest SSTRC Inc.
    ProAlert.us

  5. #45
    Jason Foster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Miller OK View Post
    Haha, Jason, that new guy called you "Junior"
    Gotta love it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Holder View Post
    You know, if you hate ham radio so much, you don't have to wait for the ticket to expire. Feel free to turn it in at any time.
    You should look at my marketplace thread....lots of stuff an ARES group might like ;-)

    I don't understand, why folks seem to think just because I don't blow kisses up ham radio (or the ARRL's) butt...I automatically hate ham radio. It's not that...it's a fun hobby...AT TIMES. There is just a ton of garbage in the hobby now. I think think this thread is an example of part of that.
    Last edited by Jason Foster; 04-06-2011 at 04:25 AM.

  6. #46
    Member Jon Holder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Reed View Post
    Brian, If you're in N.C. or Central Kansas, we'll be glad to take your reports via K-Link when we have ICT NWS talking to us taking reports. I've never heard them turn anybody away.
    I'd advise having a dual band (2m/70cm) in our area, as most of the repeaters are 70cm.

    Justin N0UJQ
    Minneapolis, KS
    Same goes if you're in Shawnee or Wabaunsee counties. Give me a PM and I'll give our repeater, weekly net SKED and invitation to our quarterly meetings.

    The way it's done here is folks are positioned where they can get the best vantage point of a storm rolling in, we don't have hard set zones one goes to, although some folks have picked out nice high spots where they normally go to. NCS is run from 911, with NWS Topeka operating a station to take reports, provide radar information and will take on alternate net control if needed.

    We do run a directed net, once we're in position we stay in position until the storm's passed or need to reposition for safety or better vantage point as the storm moves. If getting a better vantage point, call NCS and request to move. If for safety call NCS in transit. All this is done for the safety of the spotter and so they know where to send LEO/Fire if you get in trouble or go no contact for awhile.

    We've had guys in our group go "off the reservation" and start chasing a tornado on the ground, right out of range of our repeater. For 90 minutes we didn't know where they were or if they'd been killed.

  7. #47
    Member Jon Holder's Avatar
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    Justin,

    You guys get echolink back online yet there in Concordia?

  8. #48
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    Echolink is actually on our Minneapolis (hub) repeater, and yes it's back online. (It helps when people actually notify me that it's down!).

    Sorry I didn't see your message until now.

  9. #49
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    I am part of a local ARES group and we do the same spotting for NWS. Our group has a net control and script that is used. While the ARES group in fact does not send people out. We do have many that go out and "track , spot , Chase " what ever term you wish to use. Our net control checks all active spotters into the net and back out after the event is clear from our area. Mobile, or stationary makes no difference all are treated the same. Seems to me incomprehensible that any amateur net that is spotting for the NWS would take that kind of action. So I would find out whom ownes the repeater or responsible repeater holder is and have a discussion with them. If that does not resolve or give you answers then I would suggest to contact the area coordinator. Remember that amateur radio is meant to benefit the public and by spotting, chasing ultimately reporting information back to NWS on storm activity and locations is public benefit.

    Or you can do like others suggested find another net to use. There are three nets in the area that go active and dependent on my location even though I am cked into my ARES net I still can reach the others and relay information if I am border line of connecting with my net control so that the information still gets back to NWS.. Hope that helps.

  10. #50
    Stormtrack supporter Steve Polley's Avatar
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    I used to be an active member of the KC skywarn net. They DO welcome chasers to my knowledge as I am one of those. It just depends on the particular situation Brian that you are speaking of. It may have been as simple as a matter of timing. Like others have said, I use ham more for rag chewing on the way to and from the target more than I do for reporting. I rarely get on a local repeater while chasing unless its in my backyard. Continue to do what you do. There are MANY other ways to report to the NWS other than the skywarn net. But NEVER do away with ham radio entirely, it may be the only option in certain situations.

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