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Thread: TV Spotters

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Shriver View Post
    Remember, to be part of Skywarn you must have attended a NWS spotter class within the past two years.
    Talk about digging up an old thread And that is not correct. It might be a rule some areas have set, but not at all a requirement. And probably a bad one, many chasers haven't been to a NWS class in years and they still know what they are doing.

    Plus the NWS in Central Region is no longer doing spotter classes in the field, so that would really hurt the renewal chances.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdale View Post

    Plus the NWS in Central Region is no longer doing spotter classes in the field, so that would really hurt the renewal chances.
    Actually, this isn't completely true, a quick survey of several Central Region FO homepages showed that they are still doing spotter classes in the field. Here's the MKX training schedule for instance: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/news/display...78509&source=0

  3. #13
    Member Tim Shriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_Spannagle View Post
    Actually, this isn't completely true, a quick survey of several Central Region FO homepages showed that they are still doing spotter classes in the field. Here's the MKX training schedule for instance: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/news/display...78509&source=0
    If you notice MidWestSSTRC is involved with those and yes, KMKX has greatly reduced the number of "in person" spotter training classes.
    Some are now in person, some are via webinar and the others are put on by approved spotters groups like MidWest SSTRC and MASA here in Southern WI. All were "in person" before 2012.

    I was wondering if any other WFO's were doing this.

    Makes a ton of work for the spotter groups.

    As for the requirement we also look at other qualifications as well, but we do have to follow the training every two years here. I think it is a good rule and should not be hard for a chaser to do. It helps get folks on the same page. I see this no different then the Spotter Network requiring their training before being able to submit a report on their system.

    Tim
    MW122-WX9TRS
    MidWest SSTRC Inc.
    ProAlert.us

  4. #14
    Stormtrack supporter Shawn Gossman's Avatar
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    I think our local TV news channels mainly rely on Skywarn spotters who call in and report after making their NWS/EMA reports. I know when you get into the cities, there are actual paid storm tracker employees but I would assume you would have to have a meteorology degree.

  5. #15

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    I'm in a city (Houston), NWS trained and have been a spotter for KTRK tv for years. Not paid, no formal B.S. degree in meteorology but a serious hobbyist for just shy of 30 years.

  6. #16
    Member Joshua Nall's Avatar
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    I'd recommend anyone with an interest in severe weather attend a skywarn class, if for nothing else just to see what it's like. I had always put off going to one thinking it would be the basics and boring. I went to both the regular and advanced class the same night a few weeks ago, and while I didn't learn much I didn't already know, it was interesting. The presenter had taken the time to put together a lot of local events and video that really held my attention.

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